From The Vault: Looking Back At Homecoming

As I’m relaxing and reminiscing after a somewhat tame UMaine homecoming, a post I did a few years ago popped into my head. From October of 2006, enjoy this post from the JoshNason.com vault:

Home(coming) is where the beer is

“It’s good to be home.” – myself to a friend at Pat’s Pizza this past Saturday at ’round 5 pm.

If you went to college (or a really cool high school), you know about the word Homecoming. It’s a pretty simple theory: people want to return to a place where they spent a favorable portion of time. For most, college is it. I mean, c’mon. You spend four, five or even seven years at an institution based on learning but really, learning is just as much outside the classroom as it is inside. It connects people and helps them figure out who they are, or at least, where they’re starting out the adult part of their life.

For the rest of the post, click here.

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Unloading October’s shipment off the update truck

Good. Lord.

I don’t think I’ve ever cranked out this much content in my life…the only problem is that nearly none of it has been here. On the other side of my ever-growing media universe, I write and maintain two sports blogs and an email marketing blog, in addition to a fun new side project with my buddy Ben on comics. I write and write and write, so it’s time to give y’all some updates. Continue reading

Google’s Mail Goggles: Best. Innovation. Ever.

I heard that a company in Australia actually provided a service where it would lock out certain telephone numbers at a certain time to save the user from alcohol-induced calls and texts they would later regret. Who amongst us (recently) hasn’t done this (recently) and then (embarassingly) regretted it?

Google finally figured this out and has introduced Mail Goggles to their Gmail users. When you enable this add-on, it makes you go through a series of questions you have to get correct in order to access your account. The idea, of course, is that it’s meant to prevent drunk people from getting through, thus saving them from the embarassment of sending that “We should get back together” or “I hate you” or “I think I’m pregnant” emails that people send after a certain time.

Yeah, AT & T can’t adopt this soon enough. Sorry ’bout that, Ms. (name removed to save recipient from further embarrassment).

Official Gmail Blog: Stop sending email you’ll later regret